DO-178B SOFTWARE CONSIDERATIONS IN AIRBORNE SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT CERTIFICATION PDF

Processes are described as abstract areas of work in DOB, and it is up to the planners of a real project to define and document the specifics of how a process will be carried out. On a real project, the actual activities that will be done in the context of a process must be shown to support the objectives. These activities are defined by the project planners as part of the Planning process. This objective-based nature of DOB allows a great deal of flexibility in regard to following different styles of software life cycle. Once an activity within a process has been defined, it is generally expected that the project respect that documented activity within its process. Furthermore, processes and their concrete activities must have well defined entry and exit criteria, according to DOB, and a project must show that it is respecting those criteria as it performs the activities in the process.

Author:Fegor Vum
Country:Norway
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Education
Published (Last):10 August 2004
Pages:459
PDF File Size:18.43 Mb
ePub File Size:5.58 Mb
ISBN:666-7-60263-421-9
Downloads:49908
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Mumuro



Processes are described as abstract areas of work in DOB, and it is up to the planners of a real project to define and document the specifics of how a process will be carried out. On a real project, the actual activities that will be done in the context of a process must be shown to support the objectives. These activities are defined by the project planners as part of the Planning process.

This objective-based nature of DOB allows a great deal of flexibility in regard to following different styles of software life cycle. Once an activity within a process has been defined, it is generally expected that the project respect that documented activity within its process. Furthermore, processes and their concrete activities must have well defined entry and exit criteria, according to DOB, and a project must show that it is respecting those criteria as it performs the activities in the process.

The intention of DOB was not to be prescriptive. There are many possible and acceptable ways for a real project to define these aspects. This can be difficult the first time a company attempts to develop a civil avionics system under this standard, and has created a niche market for DOB training and consulting.

The processes, activities and documents described here reflect naming and structure from DOB. This can be different in a real-life project.

HTC 34063 PDF

DO-178C Software Considerations in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification

Red-colored traces are required only for Level A. Purple-colored traces are required for Levels A, B, and C. Level E does not require any tracing. DO requires a documented connection called a trace between the certification artifacts. A traceability analysis is then used to ensure that each requirement is fulfilled by the source code, that each requirement is tested, that each line of source code has a purpose is connected to a requirement , and so forth. Traceability ensures the system is complete. The rigor and detail of the certification artifacts is related to the software level.

LEGO 6175 INSTRUCTIONS PDF

Airborne Software Certification Explained

The failure conditions are categorized by their effects on the aircraft, crew, and passengers. Catastrophic — Failure may cause a crash. Error or loss of critical function required to safely fly and land aircraft. Hazardous — Failure has a large negative impact on safety or performance, or reduces the ability of the crew to operate the aircraft due to physical distress or a higher workload, or causes serious or fatal injuries among the passengers. Safety-significant Major — Failure is significant, but has a lesser impact than a Hazardous failure for example, leads to passenger discomfort rather than injuries or significantly increases crew workload safety related Minor — Failure is noticeable, but has a lesser impact than a Major failure for example, causing passenger inconvenience or a routine flight plan change No Effect — Failure has no impact on safety, aircraft operation, or crew workload.

Related Articles